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 FA Premiership (32); Goodison Park, Liverpool; Friday 9 April 2004; 8:00pm
  Unsworth (15')
Naysmith (23') 
Yobo (42')
 
Attendance: 38,086
Halftime: 3-0

Facts
Reports
Carr (75')

Carr sent off (77')

Referee: Rob Stiles
 

Match Updates

David Moyes finally sees sense and gives Jamie McFadden a chance to partner Tomasz Radzinski up-front... and what a difference!

Everton played as if they had finally figured out that you don't score goals unless you drive toward the goal and actually dispatch the ball with some intention of scoring.  The new mood was obvious from the opening minutes, when Radzinski was first to touch a fierce low cross just wide of Keller's goal. 

The wave of attacks continued with Everton pushing hard during the first 15 minutes, and there was no better illustration of their intent than one David Unsworth, who had been well and truly roasted last week.  This week, he was like a Jack Russell, in quickly and snapping the ball away from Spurs when the did get out of their own half. 

How fitting was it that a nicely worked Gravesen corner saw Unsworth time his run beyond the last line of defence perfectly to stroke the ball home of an great Watson flick from Naysmith's cross?  Excellent reward for the lumper's superb commitment.  Offside?  NEVER!

More good football followed from Everton as Spurs looked a little bewildered... well, more was to come as McFadden, relishing his new role, was running at the Spurs defence whenever he could.  On 23 mins, he beat a couple of players and broke in from the left only to fall just outside the area under Doherty's heavy tackle.  Could Everton finally convert one of these golden chances?  Gravesen and Naysmith deliberated...  Naysmith moved in and stroked a glorious curling ball over the wall and inside the post!  A fabulous way to celebrate your 100th start in an Everton shirt!

Doherty committed the very same foul just before the break, with Gravesen his victim, and became the second Spurs booking after Redknapp.  This time, Gravesen drilled the ball in and it was too hot for Keller: there was Joseph Yobo to step forward and bang home the loose ball.  Pandemonium!  Everton had finally put together a decent 45 mins and showed what they are made of.

So, a nice set-up for a second-half massacre, right?  No: Everton dozed off in the second half, eventually allowing Carr to waltz through the defence with a little help from Ricketts and slot home soon after a double substitution that included Ricketts coming on the field as captain Reknapp went off. 

The armband had gone to Carr, but he was off the field less than 2 mins later when he committed a second bookable offence.   This seemed to deflate Spurs just when one feared they could pop in anther two and make us look a right bunch of twats.  Fortunately, that was not in the script for this Good Friday, the ninth anniversary of a great semi-final victory over Spurs in 1995. 

Everton held on, but they really should have been well out of sight, laying to rest the jinx that had prevented any league win over Spurs since 1997.  And another jinx was laid to rest: this was Everton's first televised win out of 12 games so far this season.

 


McFadden: is this the game?


Everton v Spurs:
Prior League Games
 Overall  
 Everton 29
 Spurs 14
 Draws 23
 Premiership  
 Everton 1
 Spurs 3
 Draws 6
 Last Season:

Everton 2-2 Spurs


Premiership Scores
Friday 9 Apr 2004
Arsenal 4-2 Liverpool
Everton 3-1 Tottenham
Saturday 10 Apr 2004
Birmingham 1-2 Man Utd
Blackburn 1-2 Leeds
Bolton 2-2 Aston Vill
Charlton 1-1 Portsmouth
Chelsea 0-0 Middlesbro
Leicester 0-2 Fulham
Man City 3-3 Wolves
Sunday 11 Apr 2004
Newcastle 0-0 Arsenal
 


Match Facts
 Everton   (4-4-2)
 Blue shirts, white shorts, blue socks
 Tottenham Hotspur   (4-4-2)
White shirts, dark blue shorts, white socks
  Martyn
Pistone
Yobo
Unsworth {c}
Naysmith
Watson
Gravesen (88' Carsley)
Linderoth
Kilbane
McFadden (79' Jeffers)
Radzinski

Subs Not Used: Wright, Hibbert
Nyarko, ,

Yellow Cards: Linderoth (92')

Red Cards:


Unavailable:

(Suspended:) Clarke, Ferguson,
Rooney, Weir
(Injured:) Campbell, Ferguson, Li Tie, Stubbs
(On Loan:) Chadwick, Gemmill, P Gerrard,
 Osman, Symes, Turner
Keller
Carr {73:c} [Sent off: 77']
Gardner
Doherty
Ziege
Davies
Redknapp {c} (73' Bunjevcevic)
Brown
Kelly
Keane
Defoe

Subs Not Used: Hirshfeld,
 Kanoute, Ricketts, Jackson

Yellow Cards: Redknapp (36'),
Doherty (39'), [Carr (43', 77')]

Red Cards: 
Carr (77')
 
Match Reports

2003-04 Match Reports Index


Everton Web Sites
ToffeeWeb Match Summary
EvertonFC.com Match Report
When Skies Are Grey Match Report
Blue Kipper Match Report
Everton Fans' Reports
Lyndon Lloyd Moyes's Boys Dish Out Revenge
Paul Traill You let me down, Mike
Links to Other Media Reports
BBC Sport Match Report
4 the Game Match Report
Sky Sports Match Report
Sporting Life Match Report
SoccerNet Match Report
The Guardian Match Report
Liverpool Echo Match Report
Daily Post Match Report
Premiership Table
Pos Team Pts
1 Arsenal 78
2 Chelsea 71
3 Man Utd 65
4 Liverpool 49
5 Newcastle 49
6 Birmingham 46
7 Aston Villa 45
8 Fulham 44
9 Charlton 44
10 Southampton 42
11 Middlesbrough 42
12 Bolton 38
13 Everton 37
14 Tottenham 37
15 Man City 33
16 Blackburn 31
17 Portsmouth 31
18 Leeds 31
19 Leicester 28
20 Wolves 25
After 12 Apr 2004


Match Preview

3 points from 36.  That is Everton's record in games televised live or as-live, either in the UK or overseas markets so far this season.  So it's either a case of writing off this three-game series (the first already lost to Newcastle at the weekend, the third a seemingly impossible trip to Stamford Bridge) to an inexplicable hoodoo or welcoming three bites at the cherry to lay it to rest before the end of the campaign.

As if that weren't a bad enough omen for this Good Friday match-up, the Blues face Tottenham, a team they can't seem to beat any time, anywhere — TV cameras or not.  Everton haven't conquered Spurs since Gary Speed headed the only goal to win a crucial game almost seven years ago to the day.  A better omen, perhaps is that, nine years ago to the day, Everton beat Spurs 4-1 at Elland Road on their way to FA Cup glory.  Nine long years ago... and the footballing gods are still apparently making us pay for that triumph and the one that followed over Manchester United.

The last meeting between the two sides (would it surprise you to learn the match was televised?) was in September when Spurs comprehensively worked over an Everton side — that was coming off the back of a drubbing of Leeds of their own — by a 3-0 scoreline.

Since then, these two prestigious clubs, whose fortunes seem to have been joined at the hip since the Premiership began, have amounted to very little despite the Londoners splashing out a good deal more cash than David Moyes has had at his disposal.

Hoodoos and omens aside, this game will be interesting enough from the standpoint of Moyes's team selection alone.  With Duncan Ferguson injured, in disgrace (again!) and suspended, Wayne Rooney also banned and Kevin Campbell virtually ineffective at St James Park, the manager faces an attacking conundrum if Francis Jeffers isn't passed fit.

The obvious choice would be to throw James McFadden into a striking role, but that was the obvious choice a week ago and Moyes opted for the "big man" instead.  While it could be argued that that was the safe option for an away game, the pressure to try the Scot on home turf is surely greater.

At the back, Alan Stubbs is struggling to get over the groin strain that kept him out of the game at Newcastle, which is a shame given David Unsworth's performance in that game.

And in midfield, it's anyone's guess who will be next out the revolving door that is the central berth alongside Thomas Gravesen.  Tobias Linderoth had, to these eyes, a pretty good game against the Barcodes and was unfortunate to get pulled.  His replacement, Alex Nyarko, made no impact but has had his bright moments since returning from exile.

Personally, I would like to see Kevin Kilbane given a shot in the middle but that would entail putting McFadden out wide where he has clearly struggled when played from the start... but the more he plays, the more he will learn to find his feet at Premiership level.

Tottenham have struggled as much as Everton to get any sort of rhythm going this season not helped, I'm sure, by the managerial flux that has existed for much of the campaign.  They have lost four of their last five, leaving them just three points above Everton, but will have Simon Davies and Darren Anderton back in contention for the Easter period.

Even if relegation wasn't still an annoying possibility, three points will be crucial given the £500,000 bonus for each position gained in the table between now and mid-May.  The value of that cannot be understated — finishing 10th would pull in £2M more than if the Blues finished their current 14th.  The time to get this season together is now... hard to do with so few players from which to choose in key positions.

Lyndon Lloyd

Matchday Stats

This will be the 146th meeting between Everton and Tottenham Hotspur in all competitions, and the 74th at Goodison Park.  This match will be the 24th meeting in the Premier League.

Everton's full record against Tottenham is:

 

P

W

D

L

F

A

Premier League

23

1

10

12

22

38

Division One

108

40

33

35

155

167

Division Two

2

1

0

1

4

3

FA Cup

10

5

1

4

15

14

Screen Sport Super Cup

2

1

1

0

3

1

TOTALS:

145

48

45

52

199

223

Our record at Goodison Park against Tottenham is:

 

P

W

D

L

F

A

Premier League

11

1

6

4

8

12

Division One

54

27

17

10

88

60

Division Two

1

1

0

0

4

2

FA Cup

6

3

1

2

6

5

Screen Sport Super Cup

1

1

0

0

3

1

TOTALS:

73

33

24

16

109

80

The last match between the two sides was earlier this season on 4 October when Tottenham ran out 3-0 winners at White Hart Lane.  The last meeting at Goodison Park was on the opening day of the 2002-03 season when the teams drew 2-2, with Everton's goals coming from Mark Pembridge and Tomasz Radzinski.  In fact, Everton have only beaten Tottenham once in the 23 Premier League matches played so far between the teams.  The 12 April 1997 saw a Gary Speed goal secure the three points in a 1-0 victory at Goodison Park.

Everton's biggest victory at home to Tottenham was 5-2 on 12 April 1924.  Tottenham's biggest win at Goodison Park was on 11 February 1928 when, they too, secured a 5-2 win, as well as a 4-1 victory on the opening day of the 1984-85 season, when Everton went from bottom of the First Division after this opening day defeat, to winning the league by the end of the season.

The most common victory for Everton is 1-0, which has happened twelve times in Everton's 33 home victories.  Tottenham's most common victory is 2-1, which has happened five times in their 16 victories at Goodison Park.  The most common draw between the sides is 1-1, which has happened fourteen times out of the 24 draws in total.

Everton's record for 9 April is:

 

P

W

D

L

F

A

Premier League

2

1

1

0

2

1

Division One

21

8

5

8

25

24

FA Cup

1

1

0

0

4

1

TOTALS:

24

10

6

8

31

26

This will be the fourth meeting between the sides on this date.  In fact, Everton have won every match between the sides when they've played on this date. 

  • The first meeting in 1955, saw Everton win 1-0 at Goodison Park. 
  • Five seasons later and the Londoners travelled back up to Goodison Park, when Everton won 2-1. 
  • It was, of course, on this day 9 years ago that the two sides met at Elland Road for an FA Cup Semi-final.  With the press rubbing it's hands at the prospect of their dream final, Everton proved to be the party poopers as "the greatest substitution Joe Royle never made" meant that Daniel Amokachi's brace of goals secured a 4-1 rout of Tottenham, and dashed the dreams of, not only the press, but Jurgen Klinsmann as well, as this was the closest the German ever got to his dream of playing at Wembley in a Cup Final. 

Everton's two Premier League matches on this date were in 1994 when the club secured a vital 1-0 win away to West Ham United to keep the relegation vultures at bay, whilst three years later, caretaker manager Dave Watson saw Everton scrape a 1-1 draw at Leicester City to ease their relegation fears for yet another season.

Sam Wolstenholme appeared for England, in their 1-0 victory over Scotland on this day in 1904.  Sam Chedgzoy was a member of the England side beaten 3-0 by Scotland on this day in 1921, with George Brewster appearing for the Auld Enemy.  Robert Irvine turned out for Ireland in their 2-2 draw with Wales in 1927 with Tommy Griffiths appearing for the Welsh.  Tommy Johnson also appeared for England in their 3-0 victory over the Scots in 1932.

Milestone's that can be reached in this game:

  • If Lee Carsley starts the match, it will be his 50th start for Everton in all competitions.
  • If Gary Naysmith starts the match, it will be his 100th start for Everton in all competitions.
  • If Everton score, their first goal will be the 200th they've scored against Tottenham Hotspur in all competitions.

Steve Flanagan

Moyes's Boys Dish Out Revenge

Revenge is a dish best served cold but Everton were red hot for the first 45 minutes tonight.  Although their fires were tempered a little by a more relaxed second period, David Moyes can take nothing but satisfaction from this handsome victory over a team to whom we have owed a good working over for a long time.

James McFadden got the start up front that both he and the fans have been dying for and he didn't disappoint as the Blues rampaged forward in a scintillating first half display, the like of which has been so conspicuous by its absence in so many games this season.  His addition to the forward line at the expense of Kevin Campbell — and in spite of Francis Jeffers's return to fitness — was the only change from the team that started the match at Newcastle last weekend.

Everton started in the second minute and didn't let up for the first 45 minutes.  Alessandro Pistone beat young Kelly down the right and delivered an excellent cross that was met by Radzinski but his shot flew just wide.  A minute later, great work by Radzinski ended with a cross that McFadden stretched for but couldn't reach and the move ended with Keller spilling the ball for a corner under Kevin Kilbane's challenge.

Unfortunately Gravesen wasted the set piece but atoned for it in spades with an imperious display in central midfield (a late, almost catastrophic, error in the second half aside).  He played in Tomasz Radzinski in the 8th minute and the Canadian elected to shoot instead of square it for McFadden, his powerful effort parried by Kasey Keller.

On 16 minutes, the Blues made the inevitable breakthrough.  Gravesen worked a short corner with Naysmith whose cross was flicked on by Steve Watson and David Unsworth arrived at the far post to fire it home.  There was a suspicion of offside but we had a perfectly good goal disallowed a week ago at St James Park so we're due a rub of the green!

Moyes's men were in bullish mood and it wasn't until the 21st minute that Spurs got their first shot on target when Christian Ziege's shot was saved easily by Martyn.  Jermaine Defoe later had an almost identical shot saved after he had wriggled through the defence but by that stage his team were 2-0 down.

McFadden went on a wonderful, mazy run and was eventually hauled down by Gary Doherty on the edge of the area.  Gravesen and Naysmith stood over the ball and after Gravesen ran over it, the Scot effected a perfectly floated shot that bent into the corner past Keller.  It was a sublime goal of rare quality for the Blues but nothing more than they deserved.

Unlike so many performances this season, Everton were first to every ball and putting unbearable pressure on the opposition, forcing plenty of mistakes from the Spurs midfield and defence.  And the pairing of McFadden and Radzinski was a constant thorn in the away side's defence.  When Doherty made a hash of a back pass that forced Keller to head clear, the ball came back to Kilbane but his looping header was headed off the line.

The ball came to Gravesen who danced impishly on the edge of the box trying to engineer an opening but was scythed down by Doherty who was booked for his trouble.  The resulting free kick was in almost exactly the same place as the one that Naysmith so expertly converted and the anticipation as the same two players stood over the ball was almost tangible.  This time it was Naysmith who stepped over it and while Gravesen's low shot fizzed through the wall and was parried by Keller, Joseph Yobo was on hand to tuck home the loose ball for his second goal in as many games five minutes before the break.

Unfortunately, as is almost always the case with these games where one team goes into the interval so far ahead, things were a little more pedestrian in the second half despite another explosive opening by Everton who almost notched a fourth when the ball came to Watson on the six-yard line but, although his deft flick left Kelly for dead, it skooted away from him and Keller smothered.

Tottenham finally woke up around 10 minutes into the second half thanks to the burly presence of Freddie Kanoute.  Everton began to sit back and allow the Londoners to come forward more and more and they got their reward with 15 minutes left with their first genuine moment of class.  Stephen Carr was played in by Kanoute on the right and he jinked his way past two Blue shirts before whipping it past Martyn to make it 3-1 and take some of the shine off the home side's efforts to that point.

Ironically, no sooner had the Irishman given Spurs a glimmer of hope in the game than he was shown a second yellow card (he was booked just before half time for pulling down Gravesen) for clipping the heels of McFadden who had cleverly given he and Kelly the slip by the right touchline.

That was to be McFadden's last contribution as Moyes decided to introduce Jeffers at his expense with 12 minutes to go.  With four minutes left, Gravesen was also removed from the fray, Lee Carsley given a rare runout.

Both sides kept pressing and Jeffers was almost handed a goal by Radzinski but the latter's pass was too heavy and the chance evaporated.  At the other end, Rowan Ricketts saw a speculative effort drift harmlessly wide and Robbie Keane, the architect of our destruction on two prior occasions in the past two seasons, had a direct free kick that flew wide of the other post.

A fourth goal would have been nice to cap a fine evening's work but the manager, players and fans alike will be happy with a comfortable win and the obliteration of our Tottenham hoodoo.

This was a handsome win given our recent record both in the Premiership and against Spurs but David Pleat's men were made to look really shocking in the first half.  However, despite the Londoners' woes on their travels, that was probably due more to Everton's irresistible performance than anything else.  There wasn't a bad — or even mediocre, for that matter — game had by anyone in a Blue shirt (except perhaps Nigel Martyn who had little to do all evening except pick the ball out of the net once after he was stranded by a terrific through-ball and Carr's smart movement).

In midfield, Gravesen was at the centre of everything alongside an assured and understated Linderoth, while Kilbane was a dynamo down the left and Watson was equally industrious down the opposite flank.  The back four were solid for 75 minutes until they were brilliantly undone and, up front, McFadden and Radzinski tormented their opponents with tireless running, skill and attacking fervour.

A win like this does, of course, raise the obvious question of why on earth Everton can't perform like this every week, particularly in the first half when they have so often been slow to get into gear?  Why must they wait until the patience of the fans and the boss have reached breaking point before they unleash their full potential on an unsuspecting opposition?

If they can play like that in each of the last six games, a top half finish — and the financial benefits that come with it — is a distinct possibility and would represent a fine return for what has been a frustrating season.

More than anything, though, this represented a triumph for the younger members of Moyes's squad, the players who will form the core of the manager's plans going forward. Free from the impediment of an ageing Kevin Campbell and an ill-disciplined Duncan Ferguson, the players expressed themselves in a way that was great to see.

The opportunity to complete another memorable double over Leeds United is next on the schedule before a trip to Chelsea that now looks just a little less daunting with the optimism given us by this Good Friday win.

Lyndon Lloyd

You Let Me Down, Mike

My mate Mike was supposed to sort me a ticket for this game weeks ago but, as usual, the guy let me down and didn't tell me.  Thus forcing me to get a ticket via my own means the day before the game and in work, who are very strict about personal telephone calls, e.mails, etc (I'm on my last warning).  With the Dial-A-Seat service stopped operating, and the box office constantly leaving me stranded on hold, it was worrying.  I didn't really fancy waiting around all day queuing for an obstructed-view ticket on a day that is by it's own title supposed to be Good.  It's fair to say I was a little pissed off on Thursday.

Queue fax machines.  Finally got a response from the box office and I had to fax through all my details to get my obstructed view ticket.  Modern science hey!

So that was sorted.  There was much deliberation as to what time to go over etc, so it was finally decided to get the pub for 18:00.  A couple of bevies then off into town.  No, the match, sorry.

It was all doom and gloom in the pub amongst the two Ste's, both predicting an Everton loss with Defoe to skin Unsworth, as was I, while some old fella barked at me to pack in the cigarettes.  (Hes got a point)

With sufficient beer consumed, it was time to go.  The walk to the ground felt like a funeral service.  Quiet and eerie; I had my fears.  This time it was a bit more boisterous and pumping. We got the buzz.

Sat in my seat, the teams came out lead by Unsworth.  Leading the way proud and honoured as ever, then waving to his family in the main stand.  Give him a contract!

Only the one change, which was the one I wanted.  McFadden in and up front.  Campbell (dropped, retired, injured?) not even on the bench and we kicked off.

If ever there was a case for a definitive "good team performance" this was it.  Everyone doing their job correctly and Spurs were never in it.  Redknapp aside, nobody shined for Spurs as they struggled.  Unsworth was immense at the back.  I don't think Keane got past him once, with Spurs' only efforts being long-range ones, comfortably dealt with by Martyn.  Funnily enough however, the first goal came when they were in the ascendancy.  Naysmith with some good solid defending and getting the ball up field.  McFadden doing superbly to win a corner out of nothing.

The ball whipped in, shocking marking by those two "internationals" Doherty and Gardner, Unsworth unmarked to shoot home at the far post.  Get in!

Well we seemed to have finally realised it's possible to score from set pieces, as that's how the next two goals came as well.  McFadden's Ryan Giggs impersonation pulling off as he was brought to ground.  "Hit it Tommy",  "Smack it Tommy",  "Top Right Tommy" were the cries echoing around me.  I don't think anyone in the ground expected Naysmith to hit it.  Never mind score it.

A peach of a goal from our little Scot, right into the top left.  If Shearer, Henry or Ronaldo score that, it's goal of the month.  I thought at the time that if Spurs put someone on the post it would have been cleared but still.

Well Spurs don't learn from their mistakes.  Again not putting someone on the post for the next goal (although the ball didn't go that way to be fair).  I'd gone down to get the round in by then but didn't miss it due to the screens in the Lower Gwladys.

Gravesen hit a soft Free Kick right into the arms of Kasey Keller (he was awful); he promptly rolled it out to Yobo two yards out who messed up and scored his second consecutive own goal.  Nah, well followed in by Yobo, and that's three in three for him now. Two for us, one for them.

The atmosphere was rocking at half time downstairs.  It's days like this that, for me anyway, which are priceless.  While I was queuing for the bevies, the fella behind me made three valid and worthwhile points:

  • If we had our full strength team out, Unsworth would not have been there to score at the far post.
  • If we had our full strength team out, McFadden would not have been there to win that Free Kick for the second goal.
  • When was the last time we won and Liverpool lost on the same day?

Interesting reading and the half-time bevy went down as smooth as any pint has ever done.

The second half was quite pedestrian and understandably so.  The crowd sensed blood and we could certainly have scored more, but keeping it tight was the main thing and we held out well.

Stephen Carr tried to spoil the party by rampaging through the box and finishing well, and just when we braced ourselves for anxiousness, stupidness and silliness, Carr got himself sent off for flying all the way over to left back to take our McFadden when he was already booked.  Throwing his captains armband to the floor, he was out of there. 

Time to relax.  On came Jeffers; off came McFadden. The bald twins swapped places and the clock ticked out.  We could have scored more if not for some poor passing inside their box, and early in the second half McFadden did everything right except score when he skinned the two internationals only to fizz his shot wide from 18 yards.

All in all, a good day's work.

Town afterwards was extremely quiet but still made the most of it and had a good 'un.

Shame you missed it, Mike.  Hope you got home OK, Gary; less of that dancing in the wind! (private joke)

Player Ratings:

  • Martyn: Solid. England squad? 8
  • Naysmith: Solid. Ive never been a big fan but cant argue with his latest form. 8
  • Unsworth: Solid. Yes, yes, will never be a world beater and he has his moments. But stop all this rigmarole and give him a two year contract. Scored as well. 8
  • Yobo: Solid. Nice one with the goal as well. 8
  • Pistone: Solid. Good work and tidy play. Class when he can be arsed. 8
  • Kilbane: Tireless working and didnt give his international teamate a minutes peace. My Irish relations (who are all Red) pissed themselves when we signed him. Give me him over Diouf any day, and at what cost? 8
  • Gravesen: Had a great game and makes things tick. Generally speaking, hes had a good season. Brace yourself for summer interest after Euro 2004. 8
  • Linderoth: Done his Dietmar Hamman role. I remember one excellent crunching tackle inside our penalty box. My man of the match. 8
  • Watson: His usual self. Solid and reliable with nothing spectacular. 7
  • Radzinski: Done all he needed to do. Are most important player as far as Im concerned. Ste said after the game that hes world class. I wouldnt go that far but can see his point. Hell cause any team problems. Cheers Walter! 8
  • McFadden: Good game by the Scottish Rooney, just a shame he didnt score. 7
  • Jeffers: On for McFadden. Did a good job against his local rivals! Again Ste said on the train theres no way youd have thought that when he got sold to Arsenal, hed be fifth choice at Goodison now. Unthinkable. 7
  • Carsley: Did he touch the ball? 6

Paul Traill



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